Uber’s Challenging September

Uber are getting that message from all directions, and it’s made September a challenging month for them. The transport company turned over $20 billion in 2016, but its dramatic growth has been threatened by Transport for London’s decision to revoke its London licence.

Most of us who’ve lived and worked in London over the past five years will know people who believe Uber has made their lives safer, offering a secure journey home when there were limited alternatives available. Thousands of Londoners have signed petitions in support of Uber this month for that exact reason. The other side of that argument is the accusation of sex discrimination by a female driver that’s hit the headlines this week. The driver claims that Uber is putting her and other women at risk, arguing that drivers don’t know a passenger’s destination until they are in the car, and if the journey is to a remote or unsafe area the driver has no option to cancel the journey. If passengers behave aggressively in the car, the driver can’t ask them to leave without risking a complaint and a low customer rating that could jeopardise their chances of future work.

To compound matters, Uber is appealing a legal ruling that its drivers should be considered workers rather than self-employed independent contractors. The appeal takes place today, and will go a long way to deciding whether drivers should be entitled to benefits such as sick pay and the minimum wage.

Critics argue that Uber’s policies offer insufficient protection to female drivers, and insufficient rights to all drivers. The company has countered with a survey that suggests most drivers enjoy working for them, and CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has now gone further, writing […]

A Work In Progress

Those of us who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s will be acutely aware of just how much progress has been made towards equality of opportunity. Employers are more supportive, more committed to diversity and more focused on wellness and engagement.

But this is no time to rest on our laurels. This week we’ve seen a reminder that we need to keep moving forward.

In addition one in five are concerned enough about perceived bias to have taken action to hide their age, disability, social background or sexuality.

While many of us are happy with our employer’s commitment to equality and diversity, others are unconvinced. Nicola Linkleter, President of Professional Staffing, is among the prominent voices making the point that a positive workplace culture must come from root-and-branch commitment that’s clear in every strategic decision.

Here at Jane Systems, we’re in full agreement. We believe a company’s culture manifests itself in every recruitment interview, every training session and every client interaction. And we don’t believe in “bolt-ons”. You can’t just tack on a message of inclusiveness as an afterthought.

Each service module – HR, Payroll, Occupational Sickness, Recruitment and Staff Development – works effectively in its own right, and when you put them all together you have a system that supports diversity, cooperation and achievement. The Jane Self-Service Portal has been praised by employers as a motivating tool that actively increases employee engagement and training take-up. The recruitment module has been applauded as an equality aid that focuses entirely on applicant suitability and creates a compliant and ready-made employee record for new starters.

This morning I found a dollar bill in my wallet, left over from a recent trip to the United States. On the reverse side of the […]