Part of the Team

The World of Learning conference is an annual highlight, not only for education professionals but for anyone with an interest in staff development. Among the themes of this year’s event at the NEC, one stood out:

An alarming number of people quit new jobs within the first week, and many more decide very quickly that their new company isn’t a long-term option. To quote the CIPD:
“Even when people stay for a year or more, it is often the case that their decision to leave sooner rather than later is taken in the first weeks of employment”

Sometimes people just don’t fit. It’s nobody’s fault, and the sooner a square peg is prised out of a round hole, the better it is for all concerned. But how many people walk away from something that could have developed into a rewarding personal and professional experience simply because they weren’t made to feel welcome?

Without a tailored induction, new employees can find themselves in a position where they never fully understand the business they’re working for or their role within it. They may never fully integrate into their team or the wider company, they may never reach the level of creativity or productivity they’re capable of, and as frustration mounts they may well put down their tools, switch off their computer and walk out of the door, never to return.

What are we hoping to gain from an employee induction? The best HR and training practitioners we’ve worked with all say the same thing.

That’s a lot easier to accomplish when the hiring process is seamless and transparently fair, and employee onboarding is swift. Jane’s recruitment software actively supports more efficient onboarding. To take one example, new employee records […]

Nobody’s Fault, Somebody’s Responsibility

Sometimes the quirks of a different language can give us a fresh take on our problems.

In Portugal, the phrase “to feed the donkey sponge cake” (alimentar um burro a pão-de-ló) refers to an elaborate treatment being given to a person who doesn’t need it.

In Finland, “to let a frog out of your mouth” (päästää sammakko suusta) is to say something inappropriate, a pitfall that we’re all familiar with.

In Poland, “not my circus, not my monkeys” (nie mój cyrk, nie moje małpy) is an inventive way of telling someone “this is your problem, not mine.”

And that brings us to an important point about service providers; their definition of service.

At Jane Systems we understand the challenges faced by the education sector, and we don’t like to see the hard work of students and teachers go unrewarded. This week’s news that IT systems problems have delayed the degree results of students at Blackburn College’s University Centre is painful. At a time when they should be striding forward into the job market, 800 young people are standing still. We haven’t worked with Blackburn College but we do know they have a hard-earned reputation for professionalism and commitment to their students. We also know that systems problems are sometimes nobody’s fault. But that doesn’t make their impact any less challenging.

The Jane Self-Service Portal has transformed the working lives of education sector clients by giving each individual responsibility for maintaining their own HR record, while management retain oversight and control. It’s efficient and inclusive, and by sharing responsibility it gives people ownership of their career development. You’ll notice that the word “responsibility” keeps coming up here. We like that word. We believe taking responsibility makes all of us better […]

By |August 8th, 2017|Education, Partnership|Comments Off on Nobody’s Fault, Somebody’s Responsibility|